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What is allulose made from
Oct 18, 2021

What is allulose made from

Allulose, a monosaccharide also known as psicose, is a rare sugar. It's found naturally in dried fruits like jackfruit, figs and raisins, but only in small quantities which makes it difficult to extract from its original source.


What is allulose sweetener made from

Allulose is actually a synthetic sweetener from corn. It's promoted as "natural" because it is found in nature and made from a source material also found in nature (corn). Allulose is a mildly sweet "rare sugar" found in minuscule amounts in raisins, figs, and maple syrup. The store-bought allulose is not extracted from any of those sources, instead, it is synthetically made from cornstarch. As previously discussed here and here, synthetic sweeteners might be called "natural". 

Allulose side effects

Allulose side effects

We’ve already talked about the nature of digestive problems associated with artificial sweeteners above. Allulose has a much-reduced risk profile compared to sugar alcohols or classical sweeteners like aspartame, but of course, there are levels at which you may experience side effects.

These are limited to significantly over-dosed amounts but are possible. The rodent studies suggest that you would need to consume around 1g/kg (1g/2.2lbs) of body weight to start seeing any negative effects – an enormous amount of Allulose.

The overall toxicity risk for Allulose is like anything else, however, and residual build-up can be a concern. If you’re going to be consuming large quantities of sweeteners, be sure to hydrate properly and avoid consuming them by themselves, or on an empty stomach, to minimize any risks.

The greatest problem with Allulose right now is simply how new it is and the slow response of the science surrounding it.While there are many studies that discuss the benefits of Allulose – specifically those mentioned above – it is far beyond being totally understood.


Is allulose an artificial sweetener

No. allulose is classified as a “rare sugar,” because it’s naturally found in small amounts in a few foods—including figs, raisins, molasses, and maple syrup. Like glucose and fructose—the two components that make up sucrose, or table sugar,—it’s a "monosaccharide," or simple sugar.


Is allulose natural

allulose is classified as a “rare sugar,” because it’s naturally found in small amounts in a few foods—including figs, raisins, molasses, and maple syrup. Like glucose and fructose—the two components that make up sucrose, or table sugar,—it’s a "monosaccharide," or simple sugar.


Artificial sweeteners are different. For example sucralose, which is sold under the name Splenda, is made by chemically altering sucrose so that it doesn't break down when ingested—so it doesn't have any nutrition and doesn't contribute any calories. The process also makes it hundreds of times sweeter.


Allulose vs. Erythritol

Erythritol is a sugar alcohol that has no carbs or calories. It has become popular as a sugar substitute because, like allulose, it has no effect on blood sugar and is keto-friendly.


Where erythritol and allulose differ is in some of their baking properties and in their taste.


You can bake with both sweeteners, though erythritol is a bit less sweet – about 60% as sweet as sugar – compared to allulose, which is 70% as sweet.


You may also notice a “cooling” effect when you eat erythritol – almost as if you’ve tasted mint or menthol. This is not the case with allulose, which has a taste more similar to table sugar.


Erythritol doesn’t brown or caramelize the way allulose and regular sugar do, so it might not be the best sweetener to use for making a glaze or sprinkling it on top of cookies or muffins.


Both sweeteners have the potential to cause some gastrointestinal upset at high doses.


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References:https://foodinsight.org/what-is-allulose-a-different-kind-of-low-calorie-sweetener/

https://www.whatsugar.com/allulose

https://eatsweetlogic.com/blogs/news/allulose-side-effects-pros-and-cons-of-this-sugar-alternative

https://www.cookinglight.com/news/is-allulose-artificial-sugar

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