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Monk Fruit vs Erythritol
May 06, 2021

monk fruit vs erythritol

While monk fruit is exponentially sweeter than sugar, erythritol is somewhat less sweet than the glucose that forms its base. Both sweeteners can cause a slight “cooling” sensation if used a lot in a dessert recipe.


Erythritol is easier to find on the shelf than monk fruit sweetener, although both are relatively easy to find online. Many common brands of erythritol include Swerve, Sukrin, Truvia, So Nourished and more. One thing you’ll want to be aware of is that many products combine sweeteners, so make sure that you’re either buying 100% pure erythritol or monk fruit sweetener (or a combination of the two!), or you may end up with a product mostly full of dextrose! Always check the nutrition label before buying new products.


You can purchase 100% pure erythritol or a monk fruit-erythritol blend that is just as sweet as sugar!


Some consumers have stated that they can detect a slight, fruity aftertaste when using pure monk fruit as a sweetener, while others have mentioned an aftertaste from erythritol that they describe as “super sweet.” Both sweeteners are approved by the FDA for consumption without restrictions, meaning it’s safe for children, pregnant, and nursing women.


The most significant problem encountered when using sweeteners is how they affect baking. Unfortunately, neither of these sweeteners completely mimic the effects of sugar in baking; although the sweetness can be replicated, many bakers have experienced flatter, denser products that don’t rise as well. Experimenting with different combinations of sweeteners and additional rising agents (e.g., yeast, baking soda) in your favorite recipes is the best way to go. Erythritol also doesn’t dissolve in liquid as well as sugar and may therefore leave a bit of a gritty texture. You’ll want to experiment as you use it to see where it’s best used.


Both sweeteners are highly recommended as safe, natural alternatives to sugar as sweeteners. Neither raise your glycemic index and are therefore keto-approved and recommended for diabetics. Whether you choose monk fruit or erythritol is mostly a matter of personal preference. It should be comforting to know that when you can’t fight that sweet tooth any longer, you have alternatives that won’t knock you out of ketosis!

Monk Fruit vs Erythritol in baking

Monk Fruit vs Erythritol in baking

We use it in our Lakanto Monkfruit Sweeteners as a way to make a convenient one-to-one sugar replacement.


It's first important to understand that neither monk fruit, nor erythritol can match the sweetness of sugar by themselves. Monk fruit is much too sweet, being about 200-300 times sweeter than sugar; and Erythritol is only about 70% as sweet as sugar. Because of this, the combination of the two (in a very special recipe) is where magic happens in matching the flavor of sugar.  Monk fruit is the key ingredient.


We believe giving up sugar is one of the best choices we can make for our health. And a one-to-one sugar substitute is the most simple solution for people starting a healthier, sugar-free life without disrupting their normal cooking and baking routines.


monk fruit vs erythritol

While monk fruit is exponentially sweeter than sugar, erythritol is somewhat less sweet than the glucose that forms its base. Both sweeteners can cause a slight “cooling” sensation if used a lot in a dessert recipe.


Erythritol is easier to find on the shelf than monk fruit sweetener, although both are relatively easy to find online. Many common brands of erythritol include Swerve, Sukrin, Truvia, So Nourished and more. One thing you’ll want to be aware of is that many products combine sweeteners, so make sure that you’re either buying 100% pure erythritol or monk fruit sweetener (or a combination of the two!), or you may end up with a product mostly full of dextrose! Always check the nutrition label before buying new products.


You can purchase 100% pure erythritol or a monk fruit-erythritol blend that is just as sweet as sugar!


Some consumers have stated that they can detect a slight, fruity aftertaste when using pure monk fruit as a sweetener, while others have mentioned an aftertaste from erythritol that they describe as “super sweet.” Both sweeteners are approved by the FDA for consumption without restrictions, meaning it’s safe for children, pregnant, and nursing women.


The most significant problem encountered when using sweeteners is how they affect baking. Unfortunately, neither of these sweeteners completely mimic the effects of sugar in baking; although the sweetness can be replicated, many bakers have experienced flatter, denser products that don’t rise as well. Experimenting with different combinations of sweeteners and additional rising agents (e.g., yeast, baking soda) in your favorite recipes is the best way to go. Erythritol also doesn’t dissolve in liquid as well as sugar and may therefore leave a bit of a gritty texture. You’ll want to experiment as you use it to see where it’s best used.


Both sweeteners are highly recommended as safe, natural alternatives to sugar as sweeteners. Neither raise your glycemic index and are therefore keto-approved and recommended for diabetics. Whether you choose monk fruit or erythritol is mostly a matter of personal preference. It should be comforting to know that when you can’t fight that sweet tooth any longer, you have alternatives that won’t knock you out of ketosis!

Which is better monk fruit vs erythritol

Which is better monk fruit vs erythritol

These days, natural sugar substitutes and alternative sweeteners fill the sugar aisle. Two popular sweet swaps are erythritol and monk fruit. Erythritol is a sugar alcohol, while monk fruit (luo han guo) comes from an Asian fruit. Both are non-nutritive, zero-calorie sweeteners.


Here’s a quick rundown of how erythritol and monk fruit compare, so you can decide which one (if any) is right for you.


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What Is Erythritol?


Erythritol is a sugar alcohol created by fermenting wheat or corn starch, says Jamie Nadeau, RDN, a registered dietitian. It’s naturally found in fruits like grapes and peaches, mushrooms and fermented foods like beer, soy sauce, and cheese. You’ll find erythritol in “zero-calorie” or “diet” gum, candy, chocolate, and sweeteners (including some that also contain monk fruit).


Pros of erythritol

1. Doesn’t impact blood sugar

Erythritol provides no calories.

It’s excreted into the urine and doesn’t impact your blood glucose and insulin levels.

2. Not “too” sweet

Sugar alcohols are less sweet than other sugar substitutes, ranging from 25% to 100% of sugar’s sweetness. Erythritol is about 60% to 80% as sweet as sugar.

3. Doesn’t promote tooth decay

Unlike sugar and other sweeteners that contain carbs, erythritol won’t lead to cavities or tooth decay.

4. No aftertaste

Unlike many other zero-calorie sweeteners, erythritol is thought not to leave a funny taste in your mouth. And, it’s sometimes mixed with more intense sweeteners to hide or reduce their aftertaste.

Cons of erythritol

5. It can cause GI issues.

“Sugar alcohols like erythritol are notorious for causing GI distress such as gas, bloating, as well as causing a laxative effect,” says Nadeau.


Too much can cause diarrhea, but most healthy adults can tolerate erythritol in moderation, she says. Start with a small amount to avoid stomach upset.


6. Not a “whole food”

In order to extract the sweet components, Kreutzer explains that erythritol needs to be heavily processed.


What Is Monk Fruit?

“Monk fruit extract has been used in south China for centuries but is relatively new to the rest of the world,” explains Nadeau.

Also known as luo han guo, monk fruit is used in traditional Chinese medicine.

Monk fruit is in the same plant family as gourds, pumpkins, and squash.


Pros of monk fruit

1. Contains zero calories

Like erythritol, monk fruit is a non-nutritive sweetener, says Cary Kreutzer, EdD, MPH, RDN, FAND, an associate clinical professor at the University of Southern California Leonard Davis School of Gerontology and USC Keck School of Medicine. That means it doesn’t provide any carbs, fat, or protein — it only delivers a sweet taste.

2. Contains no carbs

Monk fruit is appropriate for those on low-carb diets (including the ketogenic diet).

3. Sweeter than sugar

Monk fruit is 100 to 250 times sweeter than granulated sugar, so you can use less of it to achieve the same level of sweetness.

Cons of monk fruit

4. Not a “whole food”

Monk fruit sweetener needs to be processed in a laboratory to isolate the sweet components, explains Kreutzer.

5. May have an aftertaste

Monk fruit may have a “funny” taste to some.


However, one study found that it’s not as strong as other alternative sweeteners. A 2018 study in the Journal of Dairy Science found that of five reduced-sugar blends in vanilla protein shakes, the one with the most monk fruit (and 25% stevia) tasted the closest to sugar.


Erythritol vs sugar


With only 6% of the calories of sugar, it still contains 70% of the sweetness.In large-scale production, erythritol is created when a type of yeast ferments glucose from corn or wheat starch. The final product looks something like this:


Erythritol is a sugar alcohol used as a low-calorie sweetener. It provides only about 6% of the calories found in an equal amount of sugar.

For bulk Erythritol powder, monk fruit powder, stevia powder, contact us at email:[email protected]

References:https://www.tasteaholics.com/blog/erythritol-and-monk-fruit/

https://www.openfit.com/erythritol-vs-monk-fruit

https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/erythritol

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