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What foods have lutein
Jun 23, 2021

What foods have lutein


Although lutein and zeaxanthin are responsible for the bright colors of many fruits and vegetables, they’re actually found in greater amounts in leafy green vegetables.


Interestingly, the chlorophyll in dark-green vegetables masks lutein and zeaxanthin pigments, so the vegetables appear green in color.


Key sources of these carotenoids include kale, parsley, spinach, broccoli and peas. Kale is one of the best sources of lutein with 48–115 mcg per gram of kale. By comparison, a carrot may only contain 2.5–5.1 mcg of lutein per gram.


Orange juice, honeydew melon, kiwis, red peppers, squash and grapes are also good sources of lutein and zeaxanthin, and you can find a decent amount of lutein and zeaxanthin in durum wheat and corn as well.


In addition, egg yolk may be an important source of lutein and zeaxanthin, as the high fat content of the yolk may improve the absorption of these nutrients.


Fats improve the absorption of lutein and zeaxanthin, so including them in your diet, such as some olive oil in a green salad or some butter or coconut oil with your cooked greens, is a good idea .


SUMMARY

Dark-green vegetables, such as kale, spinach, and broccoli, are fantastic sources of lutein and zeaxanthin. Foods like egg yolk, peppers and grapes are good sources, too.

Foods High in Lutein and Zeaxanthin

Foods High in Lutein and Zeaxanthin

A Bowl of Spinach

#1: Dark Leafy Greens (Spinach)

Lut + Zea
per Cup Cooked
Lut + Zea
per 100g
Lut + Zea
per 200 Calories
20354μg11308μg98330μg
  • 19276μg in 1 cup of cooked Swiss chard

  • 14560μg in 1 cup of cooked mustard greens

  • 12154μg in 1 cup of cooked turnip greens

  • 11774μg in 1 cup of cooked collards

  • 6447μg in 1 cup of cooked kale

Green Peas

#2: Green Peas

Lut + Zea
per Cup Cooked
Lut + Zea
per 100g
Lut + Zea
per 200 Calories
4149μg2593μg6174μg


Yellow Summer Squash

#3: Summer Squash

Lut + Zea
per Cup Cooked
Lut + Zea
per 100g
Lut + Zea
per 200 Calories
4048μg2249μg22490μg


Pumpkins

#4: Pumpkin

Lut + Zea
per Cup Cooked
Lut + Zea
per 100g
Lut + Zea
per 200 Calories
2484μg1014μg10140μg


Brussels Sprouts

#5: Brussels Sprouts

Lut + Zea
per Cup Cooked
Lut + Zea
per 100g
Lut + Zea
per 200 Calories
2012μg1290μg7167μg


Broccoli Stalk

#6: Broccoli

Lut + Zea
per Cup Cooked
Lut + Zea
per 100g
Lut + Zea
per 200 Calories
1685μg1080μg6171μg


Asparagus

#7: Asparagus

Lut + Zea
per Cup Cooked
Lut + Zea
per 100g
Lut + Zea
per 200 Calories
1388μg771μg7009μg


Lettuce

#8: Romaine Lettuce

Lut + Zea
per Cup
Lut + Zea
per 100g
Lut + Zea
per 200 Calories
1087μg2312μg27200μg


Carrots

#9: Carrots

Lut + Zea
per Cup Cooked
Lut + Zea
per 100g
Lut + Zea
per 200 Calories
1072μg687μg3926μg


Pistachios

#10: Pistachios


Lut + Zea
per 1 Oz Handful
Lut + Zea
per 100g
Lut + Zea
per 200 Calories
824μg2903μg1037μg



What foods has highest lutein

The best natural food sources of lutein and zeaxanthin are green leafy vegetables and other green or yellow vegetables. Among these, cooked kale and cooked spinach top the list, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA).


Non-vegetarian sources of lutein and zeaxanthin include egg yolks. But if you have high cholesterol, you're much better off getting most of these yellow nutrients from fruits and vegetables.

Lutein benefits

Lutein benefits

1. Lutein for Eyes: Protects Against Eye Disorders Like Macular Degeneration

What is the best eye vitamin for macular degeneration? Lutein vitamin is considered a natural treatment for macular degeneration symptoms (AMD), which is considered the most common cause of blindness among older adults. Estimates show that more than 25 million people worldwide are affected by age-related macular degeneration or cataracts, especially people aged 55 and older living in industrialized Western nations. Sadly, the incidence of AMD is expected to triple by 2025, according to the American Optometric Association.


Lutein protects the eyes by filtering out a percentage of damaging short-wavelength UV light that negatively affects delicate parts of the eyes, such as the retina (the macula). Researchers at Harvard University have found that supplementing with lutein daily can lower the risk for macular degeneration.


Similarly, other studies show that higher dietary intakes of zeaxanthin and lutein along with other natural antioxidants, including vitamin C, beta-carotene and vitamin E, are associated with a significantly decreased risk of cataract formation. While the research is still in its early stages, taking lutein three times weekly for up to two years has been shown to improve vision in older people who already have cataracts.


When it comes to eye health, every person is different in terms of how much lutein is most beneficial. It’s possible that for some people, even with a relatively high intake of high-antioxidant foods, their blood levels might be high enough in nutrients like lutein, but testing tissues within their eyes will show that their retinal levels still remain too low. Luckily, doctors now have the ability to measure macular pigment levels of lutein in someone’s eyes in order to determine if that person is at an increased risk for disease. By performing a macular pigment optical density test (MPOD), doctors can better give specialized dietary recommendations for protective nutrients based on individual responses, genetic predisposition and lifestyle factors.


2. Helps Protect Skin Health

In addition to being found within the pigments of our eyes, carotenoids are also present within the skin. To preserve skin health and fight skin cancer, lutein helps filter high-energy wavelengths of visible light, which slows down the rate of oxidative stress. Some animal studies show evidence that lutein offers significant protection against light-induced skin damage, such as signs of aging and potentially skin cancer.


3. Can Help Lower Diabetes Risk

According to some animal studies, higher levels of carotenoids within the blood are linked with fewer problems controlling blood sugar and a lower risk for diabetes or related complications. A 2009 study conducted on diabetic rats found that supplementing with lutein and DHA (a crucial type of omega-3 fatty acid) helped normalize all diabetes-induced biochemical modifications.


Compared to the control group, diabetic rats taking the supplements experienced lower oxidative stress rates and less damage done to the retina of the eyes, despite being under hyperglycemic conditions.


4. Might Help Lower Risk of Cancer

Some evidence shows that people who obtain more lutein from their diets experience lower rates of breast, colon, cervical and lung cancers. While we don’t know exactly how lutein and cancer formation is tied just yet, correlational studies have shown that adults with higher levels of lutein in the blood experience a reduced risk of developing several forms of common cancers. This includes a 2018 study in which researchers concluded: “Dietary lutein supplementation may be a promising alternative and/or adjunct therapeutic candidate against breast cancer.”


Lutein may act as a natural cancer treatment because of the fact that foods rich in lutein (like leafy greens and citrus fruits) also provide other beneficial antioxidants and nutrients that lower disease-causing inflammation and oxidative stress. However, at this time, more research is still needed to help us fully understand the effects of carotenoids on cancer, along with immune, hormonal and cardiovascular health, independent of other nutrients that are found in fruits and vegetables.


5. Can Help Maintain Heart Health

Some observational studies show that xanthophyll carotenoids, including lutein, can help reduce the risk of developing heart disease and stroke. Just like with the previously mentioned studies that show potential cancer-protective effects of this carotenoid, we aren’t exactly sure yet how it improves heart health. Because it has anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties, it seems that it would benefit heart health by lowering inflammation, which is an underlying cause of coronary heart disease.


lutein side effects

When taken by mouth: Lutein is LIKELY SAFE when taken by mouth. Consuming up to 20 mg of lutein daily as part of the diet or as a supplement appears to be safe.


lutein benefits for skin

The skin is the body’s largest organ. The key to beautiful skin is healthy skin, and lutein is a major player. Lutein helps protect skin from harmful light. Sunlight can be very harsh on the skin and it is a major cause of premature aging. Lutein works to filter out high-energy blue light. Blue light not only penetrates the surface layers of skin (as UV light does), but it also goes even deeper, reaching the entire depth of skin. With potential damage to all the skin layers, it is no wonder that wrinkles, reddening, age spots, dryness and sagging may result. While lutein should not replace the regular use of sunscreen, it can add another level of sun protection by defending the skin from the inside out.


lutein food chart


lutein dosage

BY MOUTH:

For an eye disease that leads to vision loss in older adults (age-related macular degeneration or AMD): For preventing AMD, about 6-12 mg of lutein daily, either through diet or supplementation has been used. For reducing symptoms of AMD, 10-20 mg daily has been used. For reducing symptoms, 10-12 mg of lutein daily has been used.

For cataracts: For preventing cataracts, about 6-12 mg of lutein daily, either through diet or supplementation has been used. For reducing symptoms, 15 mg of lutein three times weekly or 10 mg of lutein plus 2 mg of zeaxanthin daily has been used.

There is 44 mg of lutein per cup of cooked kale, 26 mg per cup of cooked spinach, and 3 mg per cup of broccoli.


For bulk lutein powder, please contact us at email: [email protected]


References:https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/lutein-and-zeaxanthin#sources

https://www.myfooddata.com/articles/high-lutein-and-zeaxanthin-foods.php

https://www.webmd.com/vitamins/ai/ingredientmono-754/lutein

https://www.cooperaerobics.com/Health-Tips/Vitamin-Aisle/Improve-Skin,-Eye-and-Brain-Health-with-Lutein.aspx

https://www.consumerlab.com/answers/what-is-a-safe-dosage-of-lutein/lutein-dose/

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